The Webster Fire-Brick and Coal Company was organized in the fall of 1869, the officers being John Bennett, President; George Edmunds, Secretary; and W.S. Gillilan, Superintendent. They made bricks in all shapes for furnaces, rolling mills, gas-works, lime-kilns, etc., shipping their goods to Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and the Southern States, as well as all over the State of Ohio.

The first school houses in South Webster on Great Meadow Road from 1915-1930

One room school house in South Webster area

Dick Fenton is sitting down on the far left. Louise Fenton Knight is the third girl left on the third row.

South Webster High School 1929

School near South Webster on Popular Road

photo by Tyrone Hemry November 2011

School near South Webster on Popular Road

photo by Tyrone Hemry November 2011
South Webster (Bloom Township) was platted by John Bennett in 1853 and lies along Rt. 140.  Origionaly know as Bloomfield then Iron Furnace then Webster and now South Webster. It is home to the Bloom-Vernon Local School District. Zip code is 45682. At one time the village was serviced by the B & O railroad, starting about 1853 and was known as Scioto and Hocking Valley Railroad, with the depot located at the intersection of Tyrrell Street and Webster Street (formerly Railroad Street).  Shortly after 1948 service was discontinued.
The township, organized in August, 1812, is noted for its great deposits of iron ore, coal and fire-clay. The township covers a little less than 49 square miles

South Webster, Ohio  Pictures & information

The South Webster Milling Co. building was built around 1857 by J. Tisen and J. Bennett. Its first name was Tisen and Bennett and Company.  After South Webster became a village its name was changed. The ownership changed several times.  Ivy Aeh's father, I.J. Emery owned it in 1866. The last two owners were W.J. Mossbarger who bought it in 1904 and sold it to H.H. Mittendorf in 1909. The mill produced flour, corn meal, and many different kinds of animal feed.  During WWI, this mill produced a carload of flour each day which was shipped out on the railroad nearby. It stayed in operation until the early 1920s and torn down in 1936. It was located on Clingman St. near Jerod Hagen's home.

Mark Howell collection

Members of a South Webster, Ohio singing group from the turn of the last century

Mark Howell collection

South Webster's only hotel was built around 1858 by Dr. William A. Watts who died in 1891 at the age of 78. It was originally his home and later used as a hotel. It was regularly used by traveling salesmen and other business men who had to lay over in South Webster from time to time. The official name of the hotel was Central House, but like most hotels it was given several nick names by residents who patronized it over the years. With coming of the automobile and faster travel between cities, the need for hotels in smaller towns declined. It faded out of existence and was torn down in 1919. 

The Central Hotel was located on Webster Street next to the Bauer building. The Bauer building now has apartments in it and is across the street from the gazebo.

Mark Howell collection

Harmon Simmering in his Model T Ford in South Webster, Ohio. The home of Everett and Callie Kuhner is seen in the background; later it was the home of Virgil and Marguerite Ramsey.

Mark Howell collection

The Methodist Episcopal Church at South Webster, Ohio about a century ago.

Four gents taking a close look at something in South Webster, Ohio back in the day

Park at South Webster view from Jackson Street

photo by Tyrone Hemry 16 June 2016

Ronald R Sims collection

The town band at a parade staging area in South Webster

Mark Howell collection

South Webster Brickyard 5 November 1914. My father with the red arrow pointing at him.  Three months later he was drafted into WWII at the age of 33 1/2 years old

Ronald Sims photo

South Webster City Hall  

Ronald R. Sims collection

A 1920 photo of the local pool sharks playing at South Webster

Mark Howell collection

Stiles' Superette in South Webster

Early soda fountain in the old Kuhner Bldg. in South Webster (next to Hanes' Chevy).

Harry Martin's restaurant in South Webster

South Webster Basketball Team.  Dick Fenton is on the left sitting down

South Webster Simmering's Market

The South Webster Fire Dept. some years ago

 LEAPS HEAD FOREMOST DEATH UNDER TRAIN   South Webster Man Ground To Bits By B. 0. S. W. Engine Had Been In ill Health Hurling himself under the wheels of a moving passenger train was the terrible method chosen by Albert Kaltcnbach aged 45 years, a laborer, for ending his own life, near  South Webster Monday morning.  Kaltenbaeh killed himself directly in front of his home at Bold Switch, about one-half mile this side of South Webster.  He had been  to his work at the Buckeye Fire Brick Company's plant at Scioto Furnace but returned home shortly after.  His wife did not know why but as he had been feeling ill thought that was the reason.  B. 0. Accommodation train No. 51 was on time and running at the rate of 35 miles per hour when it rounded the hill approaching the above switch shortly after 10 o'clock.  Engineer Frank Willis says he noticed Kaltenbaeh standing in the middle of a siding next to the main track.  There are two piles of cross-tics in front of the man's home with a path-way between them leading to the railroad tracks.  Kaltenbaeh appeared to be looking steadily at the engine and Willis supposed he was waiting for the train to pass by.   When the engine got within 10 or 15 feet from where he was standing Kaltenbaeh plunged head foremost in front of it.  He was instantly killed and the body  was frightfully mutilated.  A portion of his face lay on one side of the track, his scalp on the opposite side.  Both arms were severed.   Friends suggested to him that he lay off for a few days' rest.  His answer would invariably be that he could not afford to do so.  Several recall too that of late he had a strange faculty for using the expression "It can't be fixed" and that he appeared to be worrying.  The remainder of the train crew consisted of Conductor Larry Davisson, Fireman J. 0. Baker and Brakeman Abe Cox. Fragments of the body were strewn along the track for a distance of several hundred feet.  A package of scrap tobacco which he had in one if his pockets  was found lying on the underside of the engine pilot. The train came to a quick stop and soon a number of people gathered, among them a man named Linmt who assured the trainmen  t h a t he would look after the body.  The unfortunate man's wife and wife of his children also came  running up too appalled at the seen to discuss the tragic affair.  Coroner Dr. J. W. Daehler left for South Webster Monday afternoon to begin an investigation into the death.  Kaltcnbach leaves a wife and children.  He had been employed at the above brick plant for a dozen or more years.   It is thought that of late he had worked  unusually hard although his health was not good. 


Monday August 7, 1916 Portsmouth Times

South Webster Cemetery is located on State Route 140 at the edge of the village on the hillside...This big old cemetery is sprawled out over three knolls and is final resting place to more than 300 family namesakes of this area.. It is still in use today... The roster of those resting here includes Captain William Brady (1760-1843) who was hand picked by General George Washington to command the 11th Virginia Regiment...He received a Revolutionary War Pension of $10 a month...An early physician, Dr. Pleasant B. Cross (1845-1906)rests here...He treated those injured during the Civil War once they got back home from the front line...He himself enlisted in the Infantry and served a short time before returning the practice in South Webster...He successfully obtained increased pensions for Civil War Veterans who were wounded in the line of service, testifying at regional hearings regarding the pension claims.
Annual Report of the Chief Inspector of Mines 1909

photo by Tyrone Hemry in Huntington, WV March 2013

A great street scene photo of South Webster, Ohio showing a gent with two yoke of oxen hitched to a wagon, two churches, picket fences, a wooden yard swing, and notices posted on a pole.

Mark Howell collection

South Webster looking east where the rail road tracks use to run

photo by Tyrone Hemry June 2016

Street scene South Webster

Don O'Brien collection

The graduating Class of 1931 at South Webster High School

One of the ladies is Muriel Lucille Crabtree

Mark Howell collection

The Bull Frog Club at South Webster in 1908 in front of Shope's Blacksmith Shop. That is Frank Shope, bottom left (with dog); middle row, 3rd from left is James Shope; 4th from left, Ed Shope; James and Ed ran the blacksmith shop which Ed eventually took over after his father's death. Also, back row, are Rose Shope Potts and Nell Shope Potts (they married brothers). Middle row, 2nd from left resembles Jennings B. Cole. All the Shopes were brother & sisters (10 children in family) of which James Shope was the father.

The F.H. Simmering store which stood on the NE corner of McDonald and Clingman Sts. in South Webster was started in 1911.  William, Fred's father built the store building with a lodge hall overhead. As business grew, shortly after WWI, a hardware was added. With the coming of the 1920s, the automobile was becoming common in South Webster. In 1922 Fred applied for and got the Ford agency. He built a brick garage adjacent to the store and hardware. This was the first car agency in South Webster.

Mark Howell collection

The old United Brethren Church at South Webster

Mark Howell collection

Tipp & Baker contractors and shippers of railroad ties and lumber

South Webster Baptist Church  50 Tyrell Street

photo by Tyrone Hemry 16 June 2016

First graduating class at South Webster, Ohio 

Ronals R Sims collection

Livery Stable in South Webster was located on Market St., it was built by John Gabler around 1910

Mark Howell collection

A WW I parade with a PEACE banner in South Webster in 1918.  The Bauer Building and the Blair Hotel shows in the background.

Jackson Street in South Webster, Ohio

The old Bauer building in South Webster

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Or mail to Waverly City Guide, 455 Hay Hollow Road, Chillicothe, Ohio 45601

The little B & O RR train depot at South Webster in Scioto Co. The South Webster station was at the intersection of Tyrrell Street and Webster Street (formerly Railroad Street)

  W. S. GILLILAND DEAD The Ex. C.S. Gauger Dies at His Home in South Webster Monday Evening.     Word was received in the city this morning that Mr. W. S. Gilliland, who held the position of gauger at this point under Collector Jas. W. Newman, had passed away at his home in South Webster late last evening. Mr. Gilliland had been suffering for more than a year past with consumption -- the same dread disease having carried off his wife and oldest daughter within the past few years.  Mr. Gilliland was about sixty years of age. He was a carpenter by trade, and was for some time connected with the Webster Fire Brick Co. He leaves four children, two boys and two girls. Mr. Gilliland was a man of good qualities and generally respected by those who knew him.-- transcription by Kate Maynard, updated 2010 HE PORTSMOUTH DAILY TIMES    AUGUST 27, 1895

A school class at South Webster, Ohio in Scioto Co. in 1935-1936

Mark Howell collection

South Webster Grace United Methodist Jackson Street

photo by Tyrone Hemry 16 June 2016

South Webster Library

photo by Tyrone Hemry 16 June 2016

The Havener family  L-R Gilbert, Louise, Anna, and Charlotte.

Mark Howell collection

The [then] new City Hall at South Webster, Ohio in Scioto Co. back in the day.

Mark Howell collection

Annual Report of the Chief Inspector of Mines 1911

Building the new City Hall at South Webster
Mark Howell collection

Vic Ramsey and Russ Mounts ran this store, carry out, it was on St.Rt. 140 on the left about a mile east of South Webster

Ronald R Sims collection

Simmering's Market in South Webster.  Building to the left was office of Dr. Arthur Beomier.

Mark Howell collection

A horse-drawn hearse, female pallbearers, and coffin in front of the Methodist Church in South Webster

Mark Howell collection

Stroth's Garage, South Webster

The little schoolhouse that stood on Jackson Fork Road by South Webster

South Webster in 1938. This would have been to commemorate the NW Territory Sesquicentennial that year, 150 years after the first Ohio settlers made the trip from Ipswich, MA to Marietta in covered wagons pulled by oxen.

South Webster Playing in the snow on Main Street long ago

The Webster Fire Brick Co. invoice 24 October 1900

South Webster Standard Oil Co. delivery wagon, ca.1920

South Webster Cemetery

Famous burial: McCowen, Edward Oscar  (June 29, 1877 – November 4, 1953) was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Ohio. Edward O. McCowen was born in Bloom Township, Ohio. He attended the public schools of South Webster, Ohio, and graduated from Ohio Northern University at Ada, Ohio, in 1908, Ohio State University at Columbus, Ohio, in 1917, and from the Graduate School of the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1939. He was successively a high-school teacher, principal, and superintendent. He was the superintendent of the Scioto County public schools from 1914 to 1942. He was precinct committeeman and delegate to the Ohio Republican State conventions in 1935 and 1946, and a trustee of Rio Grande College, in Rio Grande, Ohio. McCowen was elected as a Republican to the Seventy-eighth, Seventy-ninth, and Eightieth Congresses. He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1948 to the Eighty-first Congress. He returned to Wheelersburg, Ohio, and continued his activity in politics until his death there in 1953.

Jennings and Ed Cole posing by Heller's Rock at South Webster, Ohio 

The old B&O RR depot in South Webster, Ohio. This station was at the intersection of Tyrrell Street and Webster Street (formerly Railroad Street) where the gazebo stands now.

Mark Howell collection

Jackson Street at South Webster, Ohio in Scioto Co. around 1910

Mark Howell collection

The 1970-1971 senior class at South Webster High School

Mark Howell collection

Christ United Methodist Church Jackson Street

photo by Tyrone Hemry 16 June 2016

A birdseye view of South Webster, Ohio in Scioto Co. around the turn of the last century

Mark Howell collection

Z & D's (Zornes & Dutiel) in South Webster in 1949, obviously a popular hangout spot for the younger set.

Mark Howell collection

Aaron N. Gleim, "Henry J. Gleim , his wife Maria ( Kühner ) , she was the daughter of Eduard Friedrich Kühner and Margaret ( Bance )....Eduard Kühner, was a brother to my 3rd great grandmother Sophia C. Kühner ....the 1900 Census , shows Henry J. Gleim ( age 47 ), wife Maria ( Kühner ) Gleim ( age 44 ) living with Margaret ( Bance ) Kühner ( age 66 ) ...So Henry J. Gleim was living with mother in law in the 1900 Census.

Old view of the Post Office in South Webster

Bloom Township school buses and drivers at South Webster

Mark Howell collection

Girl watchers in South Webster, Ohio in 1918

Mark Howell collection

Citizens Deposit Bank & Trust, 110 Jackson Street now closed

photo by Tyrone Hemry 16 June 2016 

The South Webster German Lutheran Church was organized in the Fall of 1879. The next year a fine church was built on Bennett Street. The first pastor was Rev. T.H. Yeager. Most of the German people of the village spoke the German language, so during the church's early days, duplicate Sunday services were held, one in German and one in English. Most of the Germans in SW came over in the mid-1800s. Many of them sent back to Germany for their brides, and they were a close knit group, holding on to their old ways and marrying within the German nationality. During this period the church was active. As the 2nd and 3rd generations became adults, German marriage to outsiders became more common. By the early 1900s, the church was inactive. After the German Lutheran quit using the church building, it was used by The Church of God and the Methodist Youth Group. On June 11, 1932, this beautiful old structure was taken from the scene by fire.

Mark Howell collection

Looking down Railroad Street beside the tracks in South Webster, Ohio way back

Untitled

The Methodist Episcopal Church at South Webster, Ohio about a century ago.

The Blacksmith shop in South Webster about 1875 

Wyatt Buchanan collection

Preparing to unload building materials to construct the South Webster City Building in 1936.

Mark Howell collection

The Bauer Building was built in 1902 by William E. Tripp.  E.W. Bauer became the owner in 1917 and it continued operations under his name until sometime in the 1950s. At its prime this store had 4-5 employees providing groceries, shoes, dry goods, clothing, harnesses, hardware, and feed. The large top story was used for lodge meetings and contained a stage where plays were performed by organizations of the village.

Mark Howell collection

South Webster City Hall, Jackson Street

photo by Tyrone Hermy 16 June 2016

South Webster's first firetruck. The driver is Robert H. Crawford and the passenger is Ed Cole.

Boy Scouts at South Webster, Ohio 

 Mark Howell collection

Marilyn Jenkins, Janet Hollback, Jack Davis, and Shirley Sparks. South Webster freshman class officers of 1958 at South Webster

Mark Howell collection

photo from around 1910 showing the brick yard factory disaster at the South Webster Brick Plant

Martin's restaurant S. Webster, Oh across from the school 

Kathy Martin Benson photo